Telehealth is booming. The need to treat patients amid refuge orders and massive systemic constraints is giving rise to the suddenly accelerated trend of virtual consultations.

Virtual medical visits across all fields rose 50% in March and are expected to reach 1 billion by the end of the year.

The rise of telehealth promises positive results for years to come, as physicians are able to see more patients and patients receive instant, convenient medical advice. Additionally, and especially important for men, virtual consultations allow patients to seek treatment for things they may not have had before.

Phone, video and email treatment allows people with sensitive conditions to seek help from the privacy of their own home, which experts believe could have major implications for the treatment of the disease. men’s sexual health.

Today, sexual health remains taboo for many men who still feel some unnecessary discomfort.

In fact, a quarter of men in one study said they’d rather break up with their partner than talk about erectile dysfunction (ED) with a doctor.

Even people diagnosed with erectile dysfunction usually postpone treatment, with another study finding that 75% of people diagnosed with the condition don’t fill a prescription or follow medical advice.

Mat Rezaei

“To improve health outcomes and change attitudes in society, we really need to make sure that men receive the best care and feel as comfortable as possible during the process. I think telehealth is the best way for us to do it. “- Mat Rezaei

Mat Rezaei, Pharmacist, CEO and Founder of UPGUYS, said The sociable that the possibility of a low-key dialogue about sexual health was something her patients always wanted.

“This continues to be a sensitive issue for many men and we are finding that patients much prefer this type of consultation over a face-to-face meeting,” said Rezaei.

Telehealth platforms specializing in sexual health – such as UPGUYS in Canada and Roman in the United States – are bringing treatment into the modern era.

Patients have the ability to securely access virtual counseling, on-demand treatment and direct-to-home drug deliveries, which Rezaei says presents a particularly liberating possibility amid the lockdown.

Additionally, telehealth continues to facilitate treatment at a time of great strain on global medical systems. An overview of Italian urological services during COVID-19, published in Nature, noted the difficulties in providing sexual health drugs during the pandemic.

Restrictive social distancing measures and travel restrictions forced healthcare providers to establish which diagnostic procedures and outpatient visits should be considered mandatory and which would be delayed.

As a result, people in need of treatment for ED were unable to access treatment.

The expansion of digital medical counseling is working to serve these patients and deliver better outcomes.

A recent study showed that patients using telemedicine were more involved in their healthcare – an important development in men’s sexual health, as erectile dysfunction can be a symptom of underlying conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and stress.

Yet for many men, sexual health remains linked to notions of virility. It will therefore be interesting to see in the years to come whether the increasing ease of access to these medical products will help men overcome taboos and improve their health.

Rezaei and others in the industry are optimistic.

“Men’s sexual health is a complicated and often psychological issue,” he said. “To improve health outcomes and change attitudes in society, we really need to make sure that men receive the best care and feel as comfortable as possible during the process. I think telehealth is the best way for us to do it. “

Disclaimer: This story contains a client of an ESPACIO holding company.