Ahe diagnosis of cancer is baffling. Prostate cancer encroaches on the most intimate aspects of a man’s life. Inger Rosner, MD, in Urology at the Inova Schar Cancer Institute, and Jennifer Bires, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, Executive Director of Life with Cancer, provide answers to frequently asked questions about prostate cancer and health sexual.

The prostate is a small, nut-shaped organ located behind the rectum in men. It works in partnership with the seminal glands to produce fluid to nourish and transport sperm. Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men, with an estimated 300,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Since prostate cancer affects an area of ​​the body close to the male reproductive organs, the treatment may raise concerns about its impact on a patient’s sexual health, including libido, sexual function, well- being and body image.

I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Now what?

While the physical mechanics of an erection are important, prostate cancer treatment has a psychological component. The fear of being diagnosed with cancer and the impending changes that will occur can have a profound effect on how the patient sees himself. Life with Cancer, a program of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute, has sexual health therapists and nurses who can guide patients through the experience and connect them with resources to learn how to have your best sex life during and after treatment. Additionally, support groups provide patients with information on how to manage outcomes, identify topics to discuss with their care team, and listen to stories of people who have overcome or learned creative strategies for living. with experience.

Who will take care of

me when I receive treatment for prostate cancer?

While you are being treated for prostate cancer, your doctor and support staff will take care of you. As a patient, you should feel empowered to have frank and honest conversations with your doctor about your treatment concerns. If you experience erection problems during and after your treatment, the healthcare team can identify the best treatment for a patient with full knowledge of their needs. Additional expertise can also be brought to the healthcare team to address specific sexual health concerns.

How is prostate cancer treated?

Treatment for prostate cancer depends on the stage / grade of the cancer, the patient’s risk category, age, medical condition, and long-term treatment goals. Before treatment for prostate cancer, it is very important to discuss with your cancer care team what to expect and what changes your body may experience during treatment and aftercare.

Radical prostatectomy involves removing cancer and prostate from the body. Surgery is an option if the prostate cancer has not spread to other organs or tissues. Surgery also helps the healthcare professional know if further treatment is needed. After removing the prostate, the urinary tract and bladder may need to be reconstructed, which will require a temporary Foley catheter while the tissue heals.

Radiation therapy is another type of treatment for prostate cancer. During treatment, a targeted beam of radiation is directed to the prostate, while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. It can be used as a primary treatment for prostate cancer (instead of surgery) or after surgery if the cancer is not completely gone or if it comes back.

Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a type of hormone therapy that blocks testosterone, which prostate cancer cells use to grow. ADT therapy is often used in conjunction with other treatments.

Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells all over the body. It is used for the advanced stages of prostate cancer or for cases where the cancer has spread to other organs or tissues. The drugs affect all cells, so the dose and frequency are carefully controlled.

Immunotherapy stimulates the body’s immune system to find and attack cancer cells. This treatment is still new and under review in clinical trials. This therapy has not been approved for widespread use.

Does prostate cancer treatment cause erectile dysfunction (ED)?

Men often suffer from some degree of erectile dysfunction (ED) after most treatments for prostate cancer. Erectile dysfunction occurs when a man cannot achieve or maintain an erection long enough to satisfy sexual activity. Erectile dysfunction occurs when the nerves that control blood flow to the penis are affected by treatment. The degree of ED a patient experiences is in part related to the degree of ED before surgery. It may take months to a year for ED to subside. ED treatment options are available. Despite concerns about erectile dysfunction, an erection is not necessary for a man to come. In addition, sexual desire is not lost with surgery or radiation therapy, unless hormones are also given as part of the treatment.

Prostate cancer

does the treatment cause erectile dysfunction (ED)?

Men often suffer from some degree of erectile dysfunction (ED) after most treatments for prostate cancer. Erectile dysfunction occurs when a man cannot achieve or maintain an erection long enough to satisfy sexual activity. Erectile dysfunction occurs when the nerves that control blood flow to the penis are affected by treatment. The degree of ED a patient experiences is in part related to the degree of ED before surgery. It may take months to a year for ED to subside. ED treatment options are available. Despite concerns about erectile dysfunction, an erection is not necessary for a man to come. In addition, sexual desire is not lost with surgery or radiation therapy, unless hormones are also given as part of the treatment.

What treatment options are available for erectile dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction can be treated with a variety of drugs and therapies. They include PDE5 inhibitors (common drug names include Viagra, Cialis, Levitra, and Stendra) are oral drugs that increase blood flow to the penis, a vacuum erection device, an intraurethral drug, penile injections and penile implants. Patients with prostate cancer can discuss these options with their healthcare team.

For more information on prostate cancer and its effects on your health, visit https://bit.ly/3bpIAIg.


Source link